so it will not. The fact that this paragraph has a line-height of any value -- be it 0.25em or 25in -- makes no difference without inline content to take advantage of it.

In a certain sense, then, each line of text contained within a block-level element is its own inline element, even though it isn't surrounded by any tags. If you like, picture a fictional tag sequence something like this:

wohnung mieten
Wednesday 28th of June 2017 05:27:04 AM

CSS Style Guide

 

This Style Guide explains the markup and design requirements for web projects, along with various standards and best practices.

projects authored in valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional and styled with valid Cascading Style Sheets will be described here. See the XHTML and CSS sections below for details. Additional sections of this Style Guide, coming soon, will provide information on writing for the web, naming and filing your documents, and other useful topics and guidelines.

XHTML: Guidelines & Benefits

Library projects must be authored in structural XHTML 1.0 Transitional. Page authors should follow accessibility guidelines in compliance with U.S. Law, and so that our site’s content will be made available to the widest possible number of people, browsers, and Internet devices. In addition, all XHTML must validate.

XHTML Guidelines
The rules of XHTML as compared to HTML—an easy transition
What is XML?
A brief introduction to the foundation of XHTML
XHTML Benefits
Four key benefits of converting from HTML to XHTML
XHTML Authoring Tips & Tools
Simplifying the work process—includes tips on thinking structurally, and tools for hand-coders and Dreamweaver users
XHTML Accessibility Tips
Making sure your pages can be read by all visitors, browsers, and devices
XHTML Validation
Ensuring interoperability by avoiding errors and sticking to standards

CSS: Style Sheets & Tips

Library projects must use valid Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to control typography, color, and other layout elements. Style Sheets must be linked in a way that accommodates the capabilities of new and old browsers.

CSS Guidelines
Tips on authoring and linking to Style Sheets
Steal These Style Sheets!
Style Sheets for your use in Library projects
CSS Validation
Ensuring that your Style Sheets are error-free (same as XHTML validation)

A number of valid Style Sheets have been provided for your use. If you wish to create your own Style Sheets, please discuss your requirements with the Branch Library’s Web Coordinator.

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XML is totally extensible

By not predefining any tags in the XML Recommendation, the W3C allowed developers full control over customizing their data as they see fit. This makes XML very attractive to encoding data that already exists in legacy databases (by using database metadata, and other schema information). This extensibility of XML makes it such a great fit when trying to get different systems to work with each other.

XML supports shareable structure (using DTDs)

Since the structure of the XML document can be specified in DTDs they provide a simple way to make it easier to exchange XML documents that conform to a DTD. For example, if two software systems need to exchange information, then if both of the systems conform to one DTD, the two systems can process information from each other. DTDs are not as powerful as some kind of schema architecture for XML, they don't support typing, subclassing, or instantiation mechanisms that a schema architecture must have.

CSS specification. Finally, the user agent can simply generate theoblique face by computing a slanted version of the upright font. Infact, this is what most often happens in a digital world, whereit's fairly easy to slant a font using a simple computation.

Furthermore, you may find that in some operating systems, a givenfont that has been declared to be italic mayswitch from being italic to oblique depending on the actual size ofthe font. The display of Times on a Macintosh, for example, is asshown in Figure 5-27, and the only difference there "A negative value is allowed, but there may be implementation-specific limits." In the world of web browsers, though Navigator 4.x, Explorer 4.x/5.x, and Opera 3.x do permit negative margins:

Negative margins have an impact on vertical formatting, affecting how margins are collapsed. If there are negative vertical margins, then the browser should take the absolute maximum of the negative margins and subtract that from the maximum of